Arrived in Vanuatu

It was a great passage from NZ. At lunchtime today we arrived at the first Vanuatu Island, Aneityum, after a great although rolly night sail. Aneityum location: Lat: 20 14.300S Long: 169 46.694E We anchored here for lunch and had a little snooze and our now on our way to Tanna to officially check in with customs. We should arrive by 6am in the morning. This port should have Internet so we will be able to connect with you all. Talk soon. ————————————————- Do not push the “reply” button to respond to this message if that includes the text of this original message in your response. Messages are sent over a very low-speed radio link. The most concise way to reply is to send a NEW message If you DO use your reply button, be sure to delete the original message text and these instructions from your reply. Replies should not contain attachments and should be less than 5 kBytes (2 text pages) in length. This email was delivered by an HF private coast station in the Maritime Mobile Radio Service, operated by the SailMail Association, a non-profit association of yacht owners. For more information on this service or on the SailMail Association, please see the web site at: http://www.sailmail.com

6/15/18 position

position 3/15/2018 18:30 Latitude 21 34′ S Longitude 170 14′ E Course 338 Speed 4.5 knots 129 NM to Tanna Vanautu should be there Monday morning wind on the stern very rolly. rolling 15 degrees to each side, a real ab workout. Have the 160% poled out, no main. 10 knts wind ————————————————- Do not push the “reply” button to respond to this message if that includes the text of this original message in your response. Messages are sent over a very low-speed radio link. The most concise way to reply is to send a NEW message If you DO use your reply button, be sure to delete the original message text and these instructions from your reply. Replies should not contain attachments and should be less than 5 kBytes (2 text pages) in length. This email was delivered by an HF private coast station in the Maritime Mobile Radio Service, operated by the SailMail Association, a non-profit association of yacht owners. For more information on this service or on the SailMail Association, please see the web site at: http://www.sailmail.com

6/15/18 22:30

position Latitude 22 47 Longitude 170 47 Course 338 Speed 3.5 knots 209 NM to Tanna Vanautu should be there Monday morning Have seen a couple of whale over the last couple of days. Both heading south toward New Zealand. Nice to have it sunny and warm ————————————————- Do not push the “reply” button to respond to this message if that includes the text of this original message in your response. Messages are sent over a very low-speed radio link. The most concise way to reply is to send a NEW message If you DO use your reply button, be sure to delete the original message text and these instructions from your reply. Replies should not contain attachments and should be less than 5 kBytes (2 text pages) in length. This email was delivered by an HF private coast station in the Maritime Mobile Radio Service, operated by the SailMail Association, a non-profit association of yacht owners. For more information on this service or on the SailMail Association, please see the web site at: http://www.sailmail.com

Beautiful Day

Our position: 24 19.988S 171 29.849E We are about 300 miles from the Vanuatu Island Tanna and expect to clear in at Port Lenakel on Monday. Today was a beautiful, warm, sunny day and we are loving it. We tried to sail with the Spinnaker but there wasn’t enough wind for that so it has been a motor day. With the engine running we had access to hot water so we took advantage of that and enjoyed a shower in the cockpit, Denny even shaved for the occasion. Barbie saw a whale heading towards NZ. He seemed to be in a little bit of a hurry and only came up twice for air. We expect another motor day tomorrow but have plenty of fuel on board to motor all the way so we aren’t concerned and really enjoying this passage. More updates tomorrow. ————————————————- Do not push the “reply” button to respond to this message if that includes the text of this original message in your response. Messages are sent over a very low-speed radio link. The most concise way to reply is to send a NEW message If you DO use your reply button, be sure to delete the original message text and these instructions from your reply. Replies should not contain attachments and should be less than 5 kBytes (2 text pages) in length. This email was delivered by an HF private coast station in the Maritime Mobile Radio Service, operated by the SailMail Association, a non-profit association of yacht owners. For more information on this service or on the SailMail Association, please see the web site at: http://www.sailmail.com

En route to Vanuatu

We departed shortly after lunch on Friday June 8th from Marsden Cove and we are making our way to Vanuatu. We left on a beautiful sunny, light wind day. The second day was also a light wind day and we sailed with the 160 jib for most of the day. By evening the wind picked up, we switched jibs and had a comfortable, although rolly, sail with 20 to 25 sometimes gusting to 30 knots of wind.
We are adjusting to being on the water again and are slowly getting into our sleep and watch patterns. We are making great progress and have already sailed 327 miles with 685 yet to go.
Our current position is
Lat 30 24.375S
Long 173 01.928E
So far this evening we have 15 knots on the beam with about a 1 metre swell.
All is well on board.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/30%C2%B024’22.5%22S+173%C2%B001’55.7%22E/@-24.4048918,168.3855457,5.75z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x0:0x0!8m2!3d-30.40625!4d173.0321333

NZ North Island – Tauranga June 1 – 4

Click here for Google map link

On our first attempt to leave the South Island, we only made it as far as Cape Campbell. The wind was whistling through the Cook Strait from the direction we were trying to sail so it made it almost impossible for us to make any headway. We finally decided to go back to Purau Bay and wait it out for a better weather window. We were disappointed but it just didn’t make sense to keep beating into the wind making very little headway.

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Landfall docked in Lyttelton marina

When we arrived back in Purau Bay we decided that we needed to get some fuel as we had used quite a bit trying to motor sail into the wind. We searched the harbor not finding the fuel dock so we headed into the marina in Lyttelton where we found out that the only place to get diesel was in Christchurch. Luckily there was a very lovely couple that volunteered to take Denny and our Jerry cans into town for our much needed diesel. We were invited  to spend a night tied to a temporary docking wharf free of charge and given the combination for the use of the hot showers. We walked to center of town and had a great meal at a cozy little restaurant, Freeman’s Dining Room. We had a goodnight’s sleep before going back to Purau Bay to wait for another weather window.

Sunrise welcoming us to the North Island

Sunrise welcoming us to the North Island

DSC_8494After a couple of days we made our second attempt to leave the South Island and this time we successfully made it to Tauranga but we did have some challenges trying to round East Cape with gusts of 40+ knots. We made it into Tauranga Harbor shortly after sunrise, feeling relieved and happy to be back on the North Island. We did have to get some assistance to tie up to the dock in the marina as there was a 6 knot current.

Tauranga Harbour was a large, well kept, modern marina and although it had everything that we needed it wasn’t a place where we, or particularly Denny, would spend a lot of time in. Landfall seemed a little lost among the large boats with no live aboard people only the occasional weekend cruiser.

We spent a couple of nights, long enough to purchase a few provisions and do a day hike to Mount Manganui. It was a 20 minute walk and a 45 minute bus ride to the  quaint little beach town with many little cafes and restaurants and a large outdoor sea water pool. We did the hike to the top of Mount Manganui and got to enjoy the fabulous 360 view. It was all so vastly different from where we had just come from that it took a while for us to acclimate ourselves to the uber touristy surroundings. We enjoyed the bustling town but we were really ready to finish our circumnavigation so as soon as we got a decent weather window we left the marina and headed for our final anchorage destination, Great Barrier.

The view from Mount Managanui

The view from Mount Managanui

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NZ south Island – Stewart Island – Paterson Inlet April 20 – 28

Click here for Google Map link – Golden Bay April 20 -22

We knew leaving Lords River would be a challenge as the wind seemed to whistle around the point into the bay. As we started to make our way out of the pass the wind was 20 knots on the nose and we had a few steep waves and current do to the incoming tide. It all added up to a nasty retreat out of Lords River with only us only going 1 to 2 knots. The waves crashing on the nearby rocks seemed to be even nastier then when we made our way in. I was again feeling a little vulnerable and scared despite Denny’s reassurances. Two hours later and we were well on our way to Paterson Inlet.

Our first stop here was an anchorage that was a short dinghy ride and walk to Oban. The only settlement on Stewart Island and its main existence was catering to the adventure tourists interested in doing the beautiful hikes around Paterson Inlet and other tourists wanting to do some hunting and fishing nearby.

We found a Youth Hostel in Oban where we could do our laundry and for $5 we could also use the shower facilities. I can’t begin to explain how good the shower felt. Our last long, hot shower had been in Te Anau. We filled our propane tank and managed to get some fresh, expensive veggies and fruit at a small Four Square store. On one of our trips back to the boat we met a great bunch of kids who wanted to know if we were heading back to a boat after spotting our propane tank and backpacks. Once they found out that our boat was our home and realized how far we had sailed, they had a hundred questions. We invited them to visit us on the boat once they had their parents permission. Bright and early next morning they were waiting at the dock for us. We may have delayed their parents plan to get an early start for a nearby hunting lodge but they were really excited about coming on board Landfall. Great kids with great questions. Really enjoyed having the short visit with them.

Golden Bay anchorage was rolly and probably the worst anchorage of the trip but we had cell phone coverage which meant we had internet. This allowed me to file my income tax and it allowed us to confirm that our visitors visa had been extended and we could legally continue our way up the coast. But we were glad to finally make our move from this anchorage.

Our rolly anchorage in Golden Bay

Our rolly anchorage in Golden Bay

Our walk to Oban

Our walk to Oban

We loved their visit on our boat

We loved their visit on our boat

 

 

Click Here for Google map link– Kidney Fern Arm. April 22 – 24

DSC_0388-1It was great to anchor in a calm, protected anchorage.  This little bay had a barge that may have been used during the busy summer season and a rustic old cabin overlooking the  bay. It didn’t seem like anybody had been at the cabin although it was fairly well maintained.

 

 

Kidney Fern Arm was a great place to do some kayaking and hiking. I found a great spot with some cockles and we had our first cockle and pasta dish. The cockles are small so a  lot are needed for a decent meal. From here I had access to the Rakiura track, one of the 9 NZ  ‘Great Walks’ and NZ  ‘ End of the Earth’ track so I decided to do a day hike. Unfortunately  Denny had to work on the head as we could no longer pump to flush, not a good thing. I managed to get to the North Hut and got back just as Denny was putting everything back in everything in good working order.

A sneak peak inside the hut

A sneak peak inside the hut

Historic dam on the track. It was a little hard to find even though I knew it existed

Historic dam on the track. It was a little hard to find even though I knew it existed

Rakiura Track

Rakiura Track

Oystercatchers having a social moment  waiting for the low tide tide

Oystercatchers having a social moment waiting for the low tide tide

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Click here for Google Map link– Little Glory Bay. April 24 – 29

This would be our last anchorage in Stewart Island. we were feeling the pinch of time. From here we would wait for a weather window to make our way to the South Island. While we waited we had some company on Landfall. We spent an evening with a couple of hunters at a nearby hut and with Rene from the yacht Ata Ata. We did a few hikes on Ocean Beach hoping to see a kiwi but we weren’t so lucky. And we of course did lots of Blue Cod fishing but this time we had some company from a few hungry albatross. They were very bold and came so close to the dinghy we could again almost touch them. A 5 day wait for a good weather window to sail by past the infamous Foveaux Strait, good bye Steward Island, hello East Coast of the South Island.

Our friend on Ata Ata in Little Glory Bay

Our friend on Ata Ata in Little Glory Bay

 

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Tried to return an undersized fish but they had a quick eye and a quick beak

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Hike to Ocean Beach

 

All alone on Ocean Beach

All alone on Ocean Beach

Ocean Beach. Spectacular day

NZ south Island – Stewart Island – South Arm, Port Pegasus April 9 – 16

47 14.610S 167 37.105E  – Disappointment Cove April 9 – 11

One of the attraction of Stewart Island is its isolation. Exploring untouched coast lines is one of the things that we love best about sailing and Stewart Island defiantly meets that criteria.  It is an island of 775 sq. miles and according to the last census we could find, with only 450 permanent residents, almost all of those live in the only settlement of Oban. It would hardly be worth only owning a car since there are only twelve miles of roads but over 750 miles of coast line. Better  have a boat, “eh”.

We arrived on a grey and windy day, the water was choppy and it all felt pretty unwelcoming. We were both tired from the passage so we had decided that our first anchorage would be the one recognized as the safest all-weather anchorage in Port Pegasus. As we motor sailed into the anchorage it didn’t appear very hospitable until we rounded the last little island and discovered a little hole where only a slight breeze could be felt. We dropped anchor and tied stern and bow lines to the existing mooring lines. We finally felt safe, secure and NO sandflies. We rested up and then did some exploring.

Landfall safely tucked away in Disappointment Cove

Landfall safely tucked away in Disappointment Cove

DSC_7936There was a clear-cut track at the head of the cove and after 20 minutes walking we ended up on a beautiful secluded white beach. By secluded we mean no human footprints on the sand except for ours but there seemed to be quite a few Hooker seals there taking afternoon naps and enjoying the warmth of the sun.

Seals oblivious of Dennis and his great fashion sense

Seals oblivious of Dennis and his great fashion sense

We walked around them all and got to the end of the beach and that’s when we woke a sleeping seal pair. They quickly scurried into the water and that made me feel a little more relaxed as these seals, especially the males were quite large. But the awakening of that pair of Hookers DSC_0319-1seemed to set off a chain reaction and the other seals became aware that we were there as we quietly tried to make our way back to the beginning of the track. We were almost home free but came across a very cranky bull. He was not the least impressed by our appearance on his beach and showed his discontent by huffing and growling at us. Each time we tried to pass him in order to get back to the trail head he made a very aggressive move towards us. I wasn’t sure we could outrun him and he seemed content to just wait us out so we had to bushwhack our way to where our dinghy was.

A little cranky after we woke him from his nap

A little cranky after we woke him from his nap

When we finally reached the river bed where we had tied our dinghy we realized it was sitting high and dry. What we thought was going to be a short excursion turned out to be much longer than planned and we were now at low tide. It was going to be a painful, long slug to carry the dinghy back to the water. But out of nowhere came a power boat with 3 big, strong men and they noticed our predicament. With the fine hospitality and generosity that we continually seem to encounter in the South Island, they quickly landed their boat and helped carry our dinghy back to the water. They were staying at a nearby hut and were exploring the area and hunting white tail deer. They indicated that our anchorage is usually occupied by locals or fishermen during scallop season which was now closed. As we dinghied back to the boat we did see the scallop shells lying on the bottom but had to settle for a meal of fresh, delicious mussels. While in Disappointment Cove I did a long kayak trip always being mindful of  how quickly the weather can change. Denny went out fishing for Blue Cod and we realized that the Blue Cod were very plentiful in Port Pegasus. And so, we feasted on mussels and cod through our entire stay in Steward Island.

Always calm in Disappointment Cove

Always calm in Disappointment Cove

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

47 12.405S 167 37.004E Evening Cove April 11 – 14

It was a stunning, flat calm motor to Evening Cove. The guide indicated that there were 2 all-weather anchorages in the cove, which as per usual required an anchor and a stern line to shore. The cove provided a good base from which to tackle tramps to some peaks that seemed to have some interesting rock formations.

The beginning of the track was well used and had some markings showing us the way but once we were out of the arboreal terrain, the track markings disappeared. We were on our own and had to make our way through the shrubs while searching for some rock piles here and there that could be a possible track marking.DSC_8004 Luckily, we were doing this hike during a dry spell otherwise we would have had to tramp through some squelchy bog land. It looked like Newfoundland blue berry picking terrain but there was not a berry to be found. After 2 hours of tramping we finally made it to the top for a spectacular display of Mother Nature’s rock art gallery. Well worth the hike. We couldn’t stay too long as it was getting near sunset time and there was no way we would be able to get back to the boat in the dark. It was also cooling off very quickly and the idea of spending a night in the bush didn’t appeal to me.  Denny’s keen sense of direction got us out in the nick of time. It was comforting to see Landfall’s anchor light during the last leg of the hike. DSC_7956-1DSC_0350-1DSC_7992

Evening Cove

Evening Cove

While in Evening Cove we got blasted by a gale wind. The guide may have described the anchorage as safe for any wind but we weren’t feeling very secure. As the wind started to slowly escalate from 10 to 50 knots we decided that more shore lines were in order. By the time we had consistent 50 knot winds we had 1 stern line, 2 bow lines and our anchor out. We felt somewhat safe but the sound of the howling wind all around us was a little unsettling. We had to endure 2 days of the foul weather but we had lots of movies, books, snacks, food and heat thanks to the unlimited supply of power produced by our wind generator.

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Collected a little kelp.

When it was finally time to make our move to the next anchorage we were prepared for the additional work we would have to wind up our 100’s of feet of shoreline. But what we weren’t prepared for was the amount of seaweed that the lines had collected. Denny had to sit in the dinghy with a steak knife and literally hack the seaweed off which took more than an hour.

 

 

47 11 689S 167 38.345E – Seal Creek April 14 – 16

It was Good Friday so we were anxious to get settled into our new anchorage and then head out to do some fishing for Blue Cod for our Good Friday ‘Fish and Chips’. Seal Creek anchorage required Denny to navigate through a narrow passage. I was on the bow and had to make sure that there was a clear passage. We made it to our anchorage spot with very little room under the keel. It was a swing anchorage so it was refreshing not to have to use any shore lines.

Seal Creek

Seal Creek

This was a beautiful spot for exploring by dinghy and by kayak.

We fished for our cod outside of the cove and met a couple in a power boat. They stopped to say hello and wondered how we had survived our last anchorage. They were vacationing at a nearby DOC hut and had seen our boat swaying from gunnel to gunnel during the gale winds. The huts are available for people interested in diving, fishing and hunting. We had a fine Easter feast of freshly picked cockles, mussels and cod bites. And for Easter Sunday I treated Denny to freshly baked cinnamon rolls. We missed our family and friends and managed to make a few satellite phone calls to squelch some of the homesickness that the Easter holiday gave us. Time was getting short so we decided to make the move to the North arm of Port Pegasus.

 

Plugging along

5/29/2017 Position 39 00.266S 178 13.387E We are moving our way up the east coast of New Zealand. It has been a hard trip so far with 30 plus knots of wind, rain, and big seas. but now as we get close to East Cape the winds have died and the weather has greatly improved. It is almost nice out. We have lots of shipping traffic around us so we maintain a very keel lookout. We are planning on rounding East cape tomorrow and then we head west, probably to Tauranga. But that is always up to change depending on the winds. we think of you all every day! Love ya Dennis & Barb ————————————————- Do not push the “reply” button to respond to this message if that includes the text of this original message in your response. Messages are sent over a very low-speed radio link. The most concise way to reply is to send a NEW message If you DO use your reply button, be sure to delete the original message text and these instructions from your reply. Replies should not contain attachments and should be less than 5 kBytes (2 text pages) in length. This email was delivered by an HF private coast station in the Maritime Mobile Radio Service, operated by the SailMail Association, a non-profit association of yacht owners. For more information on this service or on the SailMail Association, please see the web site at: http://www.sailmail.com