Evening Cove, Stewart Island

Barb and Dennis are temporarily out of range of the single sideband e-mail towers that allow blog posting while away from Wi-Fi.  They will be in Oban, New Zealand in “a couple of weeks,” and will have Wi-Fi then.  They have some new SSB towers to try, so we might hear from them sooner than two weeks.

Barb reports the weather has generally been good, but with occasional high wind.  They sound good and are having fun.

Location as of 4/12/2017, 6 p.m. MSP time is Evening Cove on Stewart Island, New Zealand:
http://maps.google.com/?z=7&t=k&q=loc:47%2012.400S%20167%2036.999E

By the way, Oban is here,
not here, you souse.

Single sideband out of action

Position as of Nov 20, 21:00 Z (3 p.m. Central): 28 53.153 S, 175 59.444 E

Dennis reports the SSB radio broke in a different way today, proving again that the sea really does hate electronics. They’ll fix it in New Zealand, but can’t post to the blog in the meantime. The wind is southerly, so they’ve slowed down. Remaining time en route is 4 – 8 days depending on wind direction.

Otherwise, all is well.

Robinson Crusoe

Sunday  3/24/13    07:00
30 04.734 S
79 10.486 W
 http://maps.google.com/?z=7&t=k&q=loc:30 04.734S 79 10.486W

Fabulous spinnaker run

We set the spinnaker yesterday around 2:00 in the afternoon and ran it until the wind picked up around 1:00 this morning.  It is unbelievable to be sailing under spinnaker at night with the moon making the water sparkle and the spinnaker light up like a bright ball.  I had to wake Barb up to get it down which is kind of a challenge in the dark.  We have been dragging a lure through the water now for a week and have not caught anything at all.  We even tried putting a squid, that had washed on to the deck last night, on a line, what a mess, I got the ink all over and boy does it stink.  Everyone should get to have all this fun.

Saturday  3/23/13    24:00
30 41.461
078 57.307
 http://maps.google.com/?z=7&t=k&q=loc:30 40.421S 78 57.673W

Robinson Crusoe Island

I had wanted to send an update recapping our day on Robinson Crusoe Island but the boat was rolling too much and it was hard to sit and type anything. It was also the first time on our trip that I have felt a little queasy so that meant spending most of the day in the cockpit. Today we rolled out the spinnaker, lowered the main and it has been a beautiful, smooth sail.
The Island’s claim to fame is Scotsman Alexander Selkirk, who spent four years marooned on the island after requesting to be put ashore. He had had a dispute with the captain of the privateer Cinque Ports in 1704 over the seaworthiness
of the vessel (the ship was rotting). Abandonment was tantamount to a death sentence for most castaways, who soon starved
or shot themselves, but Selkirk adapted to his new home and endured, despite his desperate isolation.
One could describe the town as a fishing village, down to the lobster catchers in knitted caps, and dusty stores that run out of supplies before the provisions ship arrives. The supply ship was there while we were there so the town was bustling as the slow unloading process took place and construction for repair of the damage from the tsunami was at a peak.
We decided to do the SALSIPUEDES hike which took us to the top of La P�lvora. The trail zigzagged 45 degrees uphill through eucalyptus groves, ferns as high as 10 feet and thickets of coniferous trees to reach the ridge Salsipuedes, which translates to ‘Leave if you can.’ Dennis of course would not stop until the trail ended. If he had had a machete he would have continued into the thicket to the next crest. We could have become Robinson Crusoe part II. We had our usual Tomato sandwich lunch at the top while we savored the view and took lots of pictures. Our descent was much quicker than the ascent but we felt the pain on our legs. After 5 hours of hiking we were looking forward to a beer and a home cooked meal at a local restaurant. Much to our disappointment all restaurants were closed probably due to the fact that the supply ship had been unloaded and had left port. The little town had gone back to sleep!! We settled on BBQ hot dogs cooked by Chef Dennis and a nice bottle of wine. Oh, and the hot dogs we bought in the local store was sold by the hot dog. When we indicated we wanted the Hot Dog pack sitting in the fridge display case she asked ‘How many did we want?’ I understood the Spanish and much to our surprise she opened the pack and began counting out the hot dogs and weighed them and placed them, individually, in a bag for us.
Robinson Crusoe was a great little 2 day detour before we began our 35 day sail!

The part Barb forgot to mention:
The hike was up the side of a very steep mountain often we were on a 45 degree incline and that was going up the switch backs.  Brenda you can probably relate to how I encouraged Barb to keep going even when her caves were aching only this hike was much steeper and longer.  The views were truly spectacular from the top.  Someday when we have internet again we will put pictures up.  As far as the town goes it was pretty much totally destroyed three years ago in the tsunami.  It is being rebuilt with lots of government money.  A lot of it not making any sense at all, but to get money it has to be built it government standards, what a waste.  Once all the workers leave it will return to a poor little fishing village whit a few tourists coming to visit.